Ireland: Pet Owner Totally Shocked As Dogs Fall Seriously Ill After Contact Dangerous Jellyfish

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Two dogs had severe anaphylactic reactions after coming into contact with a Lion’s Mane jellyfish

Different pet owners have been urged to keep their dogs on leads while walking on the beach as two animals fell seriously ill after coming in direct contact with a dangerous jellyfish in Dublin this Week.

The Labradors were rushed to the vet after they began to vomit and foam at the mouth on Skerries beach after making contact with a Lion’s Mane jellyfish on Friday.

Owner Maja Ziolkowska said one of her dogs, Pixel, began to vomit right on the beach and was dragging her head along after she was stung on the nose and leg.

A few minutes later her canine Tasi began to experience the exact same symptoms.

The dogs were critically ill after the incident but have made a recovery this morning.

I noticed a cut on the yellow one’s nose and about ten minutes later she began to vomit and foam at the mouth – said Maja

She was dragging her head along and it was quite scary. A few minutes later the other one began to have the same symptoms. At the vet they were treated with antihistamines because they were having an allergic reaction. They were kept in overnight for observation, just to make sure their airways weren’t swollen.

Pet Owner Totally Shocked As Dogs Fall Seriously Ill After Contact Dangerous Jellyfish

Lion’s Mane jellyfish found at Templetown Beach, Co Louth

There are a lot of warnings on the beach for swimmers, but it’s important to be aware that these can sting your dogs as well. Luckily, the dogs are doing fine now.

Furthermore, a spokesperson from the DSPCA has warned pet owners to keep their dogs on leads while walking on the beach as a means of prevention.

People have to keep their pets on leads. It would be our advice to avoid letting your dog swim in the sea anyway, but particularly if there’s a risk they could be stung,” said Gillian Bird, Education Officer at the DSPCA.

Like with humans, when a dog gets stung, it’s important to clean the sting with seawater and remove the barbs from the skin as soon as possible.

The worst thing is to put fresh water on it, but they say vinegar can help take away the sting of it.

Unfortunately we can’t police the beach and the oceans for jellyfish so our best advice for prevention would to be just keep them on the lead – she said

Pet Owner Totally Shocked As Dogs Fall Seriously Ill After Contact Dangerous Jellyfish

Lions mane jellyfish out at the Forty Foot in Sandycove Dublin today people are asked not to go in Credit: Fergal Phillips

Beaches along Ireland’s east coast have issued several warnings this summer, urging swimmers to be cautious of the Lion’s Mane jellyfish which has the potential to cause serious allergic reactions in those that are stung.

John Leech of Irish Water Safety revealed that there is at least one hospitalisation in Ireland each year following a sting from a Lion’s Mane jellyfish and swimmers in Louth, Meath, Dublin, Wicklow and Wexford should be extremely vigilant.

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